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  • Even though a film may appear loaded for Oscar bear, it doesn’t take long for critics and the box office to transform it into a load of awards season bull.

    Oscar season is somewhat like a Rotary Club bake-off. There’s generally a lot of talk about new recipes for success, and everyone excitedly looks forward to trying something new and perhaps a bit exotic. Yet when it comes time to hand out the blue ribbons, it’s often the most tried and true concoctions, or at least some slight iteration upon an old favorite, that carry the day. For example, awards voters have proven time and again their love for epic-scale productions (Titanic, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King … The English Patient), just one of many easily identifiable Oscar and Golden Globe trends. At this time of year, various pundits are well into the momentum – or lack thereof – of various actors, actresses and films. If a performer is lucky enough to score an early nomination or award (e.g. Cate Blanchett as Venice’s Best Actress, Juno as the Rome Film Festival’s Best Feature, etc.), it generally begets them extra opportunities, within the larger context of the odds favoring previous winners and honorees. Like Lions for Lambs opening this weekend, Reservation Road was on paper a film with all the essential Oscar bait ingredients. It stars Joaquin Phoenix – twice nominated for an Academy Award, most recently in 2006 for his turn as Johnny Cash in Walk the Line — and Mark Ruffalo, an habitual awards season flirter. The film’s female lead, Jennifer Connelly, was of course 2002’s Best Supporting Actress for her role in A Beautiful Mind.
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  • Author: Luciana
  • November 09, 2007
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  • MoviesNewsReal Men

    NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) – Mark Ruffalo and Ethan Hawke will play Boston thugs in the true-life crime drama “Real Men Cry.”

    Hawke and Ruffalo’s respective characters, Paulie and Brian, are childhood friends forced to survive on the tough streets of South Boston through a life of petty thievery. They join a local gang of criminals, but Brian finds it hard to reconcile his work and friendship with Paulie and his relationship with his wife (Amanda Peet) and son.

    First-time feature director Brian Goodman based Ruffalo’s character on his own experiences with a friend who is now serving 100 years in prison for armed robbery. Continue reading

  • Author: Luciana
  • October 29, 2007
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  • “Reservation Road” falls victim to a common affliction of parallel-action narratives: One story is far more meaningful and emotionally affecting than the other. Director Terry George’s latest film is about how grief, guilt and introspection emerge in two men involved in a fatal accident. It tries to mix an intensely internalized Mark Ruffalo performance with Joaquin Phoenix’s scenes, which descend into a contrived haze of investigatory paranoia. It’s a character drama mistakenly reworked as a tense thriller. Continue reading

  • Author: Luciana
  • October 19, 2007
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  • Nobody does sheepish guilt like Mark Ruffalo. The doggedly boyish-looking actor from You Can Count On Me, We Don’t Live Here Anymore and (as proof he can do rom-coms as well as the next guy) 13 Going On 30 has a real penchant for playing remorseful dudes. That quality is perfect for his role as Reservation Road’s Dwight Arno, the man who leaves behind Ethan and Grace Learner’s (Joaquin Phoenix and Jennifer Connelly) son in a hit-and-run and then must live with the consequences. I spoke with Ruffalo during the Film Festival, where, fittingly, he spent the entire interview in shadow. Continue reading

  • Author: Luciana
  • October 18, 2007
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  • Always at the top of his game in every movie he does, Mark Ruffalo might be one of America’s most underrated actors, which may be why he’s unlikely to get nearly the attention he deserves for his performance in Reservation Road, an adaptation of John Burnham Schwartz’s stirring novel about the grief and guilt surrounding a hit ‘n’ run accident.

    In this dramatic film adaptation by Terry George (Hotel Rwanda), Ruffalo plays Dwight Arno, a Connecticut lawyer who’s been separated from his wife (Mira Sorvino) but who still wants to spend time with his young son, something that might be taken away from him after a tragic accident in which he hits and kills a young boy with his SUV and then decides to drive off. Racked by guilt, Dwight suddenly finds himself in constant contact with the boy’s grieving parents, played by Joaquin Phoenix and Jennifer Connelly, without them realizing he’s to blame.

    Most people seeing this movie will probably put their main focus on the grief suffered by the boy’s parents, but in actuality, Ruffalo has the more interesting part, as we watch him dealing with the repercussions of his action while struggling with the decision on whether to confess and face possible jail time. Continue reading

  • Author: Luciana
  • October 15, 2007
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  • variety.jpgThis under-rated star picks favourites in film and politics

    Not only is Mark Ruffalo one of the finest actors working today, he’s also probably the most self-effacing.

    The former stage actor’s brand of performance is the kind that too often goes unnoticed. Like a chameleon, Ruffalo inhabits the space of a character to an extent that most don’t recognize the actor beneath. Sure enough, audiences end up showering his costars with recognition instead.

    Overdue for some awards recognition of his own, Ruffalo has already punched in two memorable performances this year that could serve as his ticket to the Oscars, with stand-out roles in Zodiac and Reservation Road (which opens this Friday). Ruffalo would rather not play favourites. After some arm twisting he leans towards Zodiac, but not for his own purposes. Continue reading

  • Author: Luciana
  • October 15, 2007
  • 3 Comments